“Project” management

What to do when some believer makes you their “project”? This Reddit thread has an interesting discussion of how to handle it when someone makes a concerted, ongoing effort  to convert you.

I have to say, I think it would be really cool if some believer wanted to make me their “project,” because I’d feel like I had permission to really defend my worldview and even criticize theirs (of course, it would be different if the believer in question was my boss or someone I absolutely had to remain on good terms with).

Even if they turned out (like many people) to be considerably less happy on the receiving end of the treatment they’re happy to dish out, I’d feel like I had the moral high ground (or at least moral equivalency). And if they ever objected to my treatment of them, I’d have a jumping-off point for discussing whether their (equivalent) treatment of me was appropriate.

The problem is, what if it’s not an out-in-the-open “project” per se, but more of a pattern of dropping hints, leaving Bibles on your desk, or that sort of thing? Can you handle it the same way? Should you? If you make a point of doing a “tit for tat” then it may be your actions, rather than the other person’s, that bring the conflict out in the open.

And, of course, the whole moral “high ground” or “equivalency” thing may not be perceived by others the same way it’s perceived by you. In this society, people who are pushy about their religion are classified as “religious,” while people who are pushy about their atheism are branded as “militant.”

(pic via ORTHODIXIE)

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3 responses to this post.

  1. I ran into that guy last summer while playing a disc golf tournament. He was a youth minister in my 4some and my atheism came up in conversation. I immediately became his “project”. It’s not as much fun as it sounds.

    Reply

  2. I was at work one day, being a sales associate, when a customer approached me under the false pretense that she wanted to buy something. I’d spent too much time with her as she yammered on and then talked about religion, handing me a pamphlet and leaving: I’d been hood-winked, horn-swaggled. I hate when the word “Atheists” is put on religious pamphlets to think they’re a group that can easily be swayed. I realized that believers see us as rebellious children turning their backs on their father, whereas we see believers still believing in Santa Claus.

    Not spamming or anything, but a friend of mine, Jeffrey Olsson from Winnipeg, Manitoba, has his own blog about rational thinking and atheism.

    Reply

  3. As enticing as putting them in their proper place would seem, I know that it would be a waste of my time and energy in the end. So instead of giving in to the urge to purge, I just walk away while thinking the words their God in Human’s clothing is supposed to have said: “Forgive them, for they know not what they do.” Of course my interpretation of what that statement means is entirely different from theirs. To me it means: “I’ll acknowledge your existence no longer, and will leave you now to your fate.”

    Reply

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